CSUMB president leaves a legacy of service and higher graduation rates

After delaying retirement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Eduardo Ochoa, Ph.D., president of California State University, Monterey Bay, is ready to hang up his hat. As of May 19, his last day set for July 31. A new president has not been decided on; the school is in the final round of interviews. Since arriving in 2012, Ochoa helped increase CSUMB’s graduation rates from 27.1% in 2012 to 40.3% in 2017.In addition, he expanded the CSUMB’s educational opportunities, physical campus and number of faculty members. Under Ochoa’s leadership, CSUMB increased the number of faculty members by 39%. Moreover, Ochoa helped establish a College of Business and oversaw the rehabilitation of 40,558 square feet of the campus. The college also removed 111 dilapidated buildings and constructed of four newer ones: The Promontory, Business and Information Technology Building, College of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences Building and Otter Student Union. “I often tell my faculty and staff we are one of the few industries where we can feel very good about our product without any reservations. There’s no downsides to what we do,” Ochoa said. Ochoa’s career in higher education expands far beyond Monterey County. For nearly four decades, Ochoa was in service to the California State University system and worked at five different campuses as a professor, dean and later president. He also served in the Obama Administration as assistant secretary for postsecondary education for two years. During his time was the development of a College Scorecard, which tracks the success of graduates by institution.”That opened up a whole new world of looking at how well institutions perform,” Ochoa said. “Before that, the US News and World Report was the only ranking of universities that people looked at it. Those were very biased and gave too much importance to reputation and didn’t really measure the effectiveness of institutions. With this new linkage we were able to show which institution was most successful at promoting upward mobility among their students. And in fact, the California State University campuses came out at the very top of the national rankings.” With a little over two months left, Ochoa said he’s looking forward to having more time to relax. “I’m going to take the advice many people have given me, and basically not make any major commitments for six months,” Ochoa said. “Just rest, relax, let things settle down and see where my interests really are. I imagine I’ll be doing something different. I like to keep growing and keep learning.”

After delaying retirement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Eduardo Ochoa, Ph.D., president of California State University, Monterey Bay, is ready to hang up his hat. As of May 19, his last day set for July 31.

A new president has not been decided on; the school is in the final round of interviews.


Since arriving in 2012, Ochoa helped increase CSUMB’s graduation rates from 27.1% in 2012 to 40.3% in 2017.

In addition, he expanded the CSUMB’s educational opportunities, physical campus and number of faculty members.

Under Ochoa’s leadership, CSUMB increased the number of faculty members by 39%. Moreover, Ochoa helped establish a College of Business and oversaw the rehabilitation of 40,558 square feet of the campus. The college also removed 111 dilapidated buildings and constructed of four newer ones: The Promontory, Business and Information Technology Building, College of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences Building and Otter Student Union.

“I often tell my faculty and staff we are one of the few industries where we can feel very good about our product without any reservations. There’s no downsides to what we do,” Ochoa said.

Ochoa’s career in higher education expands far beyond Monterey County.

For nearly four decades, Ochoa was in service to the California State University system and worked at five different campuses as a professor, dean and later president.

He also served in the Obama Administration as assistant secretary for postsecondary education for two years. During his time was the development of a College Scorecard, which tracks the success of graduates by institution.

“That [College Scorecard] opened up a whole new world of looking at how well institutions perform,” Ochoa said. “Before that, the US News and World Report was the only ranking of universities that people looked at it. Those were very biased and gave too much importance to reputation and didn’t really measure the effectiveness of institutions. With this new linkage we were able to show which institution was most successful at promoting upward mobility among their students. And in fact, the California State University campuses came out at the very top of the national rankings.”

With a little over two months left, Ochoa said he’s looking forward to having more time to relax.

“I’m going to take the advice many people have given me, and basically not make any major commitments for six months,” Ochoa said. “Just rest, relax, let things settle down and see where my interests really are. I imagine I’ll be doing something different. I like to keep growing and keep learning.”

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